Archive for the 'Social Media' Category

Enterprise 2.0 – Day 2.0

Keith August 14th, 2008

A good day today.  Met some good people, and all of the presentations were good. 

Great live Second Life demo from Decka Mah (aka Lindy McKeown) to end the day.  She also introduced us to PicLens – a cool Google plug-in for image viewing.  Second Life is definitely a usable environment for learning, but the interface probably has a way to go yet to be really seamless.  One thing to remember – it really works best as a synchronous learning environment – you have to be there at the right time.  One neat application – a virtual city for immersive language learning.

You’ve heard of blended learning?  Well, with Second Life, you can have “mixed reality”.

Some of us got a Twitter commentary going.  See the tweets here – and a couple of rogue ones here.

Chieftech mentioned this site as a good source for info on RSS for the enterprise – he has also blogged about the day.

Lots of other good stuff, but I really need to make sure I am all ready to present my workshop tomorrow.  A few parting thoughts that caught my attention, (somewhat paraphrased) from various presenters today:

  • “So there are photos of me drunk on Facebook.  So what if a prospective employer sees them? If they don’t like it, then I don’t want to work there, anyway!” Continue Reading »

Connect, develop, contribute

Keith August 13th, 2008

“Social media has enabled me to feel ahead, not behind as I return to work after 2nd baby.”
 - Serena Joyner (on Twitter

While preparing for my workshop for Key Forums on Friday – Using social media to harness knowledge within an organisation: Addressing the challenges – (breathe in now) I read this great tweet from Serena Joyner on the benefit she has found in Social Networking tools as she returns to work after her second baby.

Serena then directed me to a longer blog post that she has written on this topic, which was inspired by a similar blog post from “wonderwebby” (Jasmin Tragas), who I have only met recently via Twitter.

They each have a number of points to make about the the benefits of social networking, and wonderwebby has a number of additional ones from others as comments on her post.  In brief summary, these points (which I have now added to Friday’s slide pack) are:

  • Personal development.
  • Providing a “virtual water-cooler” – a looser network than the face-to-face one, but a network that includes thought leaders, and is “warmer” than the community provided on a (more traditional technology) listserve. Continue Reading »

On the road

Keith August 12th, 2008

On my way to Sydney for client meetings, and to present at a Key Forums conference: Enterprise 2.0 for Information Professionals.

Twitter as an important resource

Keith August 5th, 2008

“If only most companies realised the treasure trove of expertise and information that their employees would be able to access if they encouraged the use of such services.”
 - Shane Goldberg

Just bumped into Shane on Twitter.  He also has a blog.

He has quite a few interesting blog posts, but the current one caught my eye in particular.  Shane has found that Twitter: “is actually becoming an essential part of my information-sourcing activities, which are critical to my role.”  So, for Shane, a public social networking tool is far from being a distraction from “real work”.

As Shane puts it:

“… many large companies are oblivious to the type of benefits that (open, publicly available) Web 2.0 services like Twitter can provide to their employees… 

“These open systems allow employees to draw on the social networks they have created in the same way they use traditional internal informal networks that are always so beneficial to those who know how to use them.”

Read the full article at Shugg’s World.

The power of story

Keith August 4th, 2008

You may have caught this video on YouTube, or seen it going around on email or FaceBook. 

So many emotive emails turn out to be fake – it is refreshing to find that this one (according to Today) is apparently a true story.  Just looking at the hair styles in the video places this in the early seventies! The original version was shot on 16mm film (yes, remember film?) without sound (making it easier to dub schmaltzy music over it).

It appears that “Christian” the lion was actually bought at Harrods by two Australians – Anthony Bourke and John Rendall – in 1969, kept in the basement of a London furniture store for a year and eventually repatriated to Africa, in the care of George Adamson of Born Free fame. (This came about because the actors who played Joy and George Adamson in the movie just coincidentally happened to drop in to the shop one day.) 

The Today article states that the reunion shown in the video took place in 1972. The YouTube version of the video linked above also shows George Adamson. 

The really amazing part of the story is a later reunion in 1974.  Christian hadn’t been seen for three months, but suddenly reappeared and sat on a rock outside Adamson’s camp the night before Bourke and Rendall landed, as if waiting.

Continue Reading »

Danger, Will Robinson, danger…

Keith July 31st, 2008

Apologies if you have visited this site any time in the last 12 hours or so, and noticed that it didn’t look quite right.  Something caused complete chaos…

I realised that I hadn’t checked for dead links for ages, and ran LinkSleuth.  In fact, I may never have used it since setting up the WordPress blog.  This is a great little program that has always worked very nicely in the past, but this time it apparently caused complete chaos.  Half the posts on the site vanished, the theme changed back to the basic old WordPress look, and all the Categories vanished.

I am still not quite sure what happened.  I may have entered the URL into LinkSleuth in such a way that it behaved incorrectly; the way I have my site set up with redirects may have upset LinkSleuth; or LinkSleuth may just be a bit dangerous with WordPress for some reason.  I’m not sure about this, but I can’t find anyone else complaining about it on Google.

Continue Reading »

A job worth doing

Keith July 23rd, 2008

“If something’s worth doing, it’s worth making someone else do it.”

I’m sitting in a small bar in Bourke St called “Spleen Central“, listening to a great three-piece jazz band (Heather Stewart jazz blues trio – featuring Heather on violin). Just come from this month’s KMLF meeting – more about that later. Ideal environment for a final post on KM Australia…

The quote above is in reference to another twist on social networking – Dabble Do. The idea is to use your online social network to get your friends to do your stuff for you.

The first session of the second day (which I sadly missed part of) was from Jeff Kelly. The following points are mostly from Jeff, so far as I remember.  (* Late addition – I expect some were also from John Girard and Ian Farmer of Bullseye – apologies to any other presenters I may be quoting here!)

  • Enterprise 2.0 is supported by three legs – technology, process and culture, and all three must be in balance. Unlike the old days of big IT installations, the technology is now the easy bit. Culture is now the challenge. We have to move from command and control to open and sharing.
  • Continue Reading »

The power of openness

Keith July 23rd, 2008

How An Unknown Artist’s Work Became a Social Media Brand Thanks To the Power of Community – another story about the power of sharing, and social media: The Fail Whale.

This story shows the value of open content. By making an artwork freely available, an artist “is now going to profit in more ways than if she had simply made the art available for purchase.”  See more of the artist’s work here.

I just love these stories.  This again highlights the new direction for life and commerce made possible by social media.

Zigging and tagging

Keith July 22nd, 2008

“It has always surprised me how little attention philosophers have paid to humour, since it is a more significant process of mind than reason. Reason can only sort out perceptions, but the humor process is involved in changing them.”
- Edward de Bono

The last presentation at KM Australia last night was from Gene Smith. This was one of my favourite types of presentation – wide-ranging, interesting, mind-expanding and minimal text on the slides.

The main topic was the future of information architecture. Among other things, Gene talked about the following:

  • Twitter search – compared to Google, this adds the power of mining conversations, as well as content.
  • Microformats – DOPPLR uses microformats to import your Twitter contacts. (Guess I’d better try this…)
  • Somebody during the afternoon – I think it was Gene – mentioned the Semantic Web in the same category as time machines: “not practical”.
  • Tagging – particularly social tagging (delicious, etc). He also mentioned ZigTag, which offers “tagging with semantic context.”

Continue Reading »

Rumours of the death of KM exaggerated

Keith July 21st, 2008

This will be the first of a few posts directly from the floor of Ark Group’s KM Australia 2008.

(For all posts on this topic, see the KM Aus 08 category.)

The show started on a good note. Arthur Shelley asked for a show of hands from the audience to indicate all those from organisations that are increasing their investment in Knowledge Management. Over half of the audience of around 150 put up their hands.

This is definitely good news!

Sad news from Ark, though – Kylie is moving on! (Good news for Kylie, though – congratulations!)

Interesting keynote from Hideo Yamazaki. Japanese companies previously had very effective social networks, but the focus on efficiency in the 1990s destroyed this. This loss of “shared feelings” has destroyed trust, and thus reduced knowledge sharing.

The current awakening in the west to the importance of networks and trust means that we all now need to go back to where Japan already was for hundreds of years…

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