Archive for the 'Community' Category

Where is the context? (And another event)

Keith November 7th, 2007

A belated note from the Enterprise Change Management conference in KL at the end of August:

“The context for most structured data lies in unstructured data.  The IT industry has come a long way in managing structured data, but has a long way to go yet in managing unstructured data.  The two are handled totally separately.” 

 - Alan Pelz-Sharpe, CMS Watch

 ———

Next week, I will be in Sydney at two conferences for Ark Group: Driving Effective Intranet Delivery in the Public Sector and Promoting a Culture of Knowledge in the Public Sector.  I am talking about Maintaining the currency and accuracy of content at the first of these, and Using social media to engage stakeholders and the community at the second – a late inclusion in the program.

After realising that Matt Moore and I would be somewhat overlapping in our content, we are now planning a double act – should be a bit of fun!

If you are in Sydney, and would like to catch up, drop me a line!

Challenging how knowledge is created

Keith June 12th, 2007

I went to a seminar about wikis organised by education.au a while ago (27 April), where Jimmy Wales, the “father” of Wikipedia, presented.  Another key speaker was Mark Pesce.  It was a great learning experience. 

We heard a lot about Wikipedia (a non-profit organisation), and Jimmy’s other organisation, Wikia, which provides wiki platforms on a for-profit basis.

One important learning from Jimmy’s experience is that it is possible to set up a sustainable wiki with as few as 5 to 10 dedicated people.  There is even one case of a successful wiki started by a single (very) dedicated person.  Jimmy referred to Wiki as a “return to folk culture”.  It is all about a group of individuals each doing their own bit.

It’s all about accountability, not gate-keeping.  Anybody can edit – the default position is to trust people.  This has also been my experience with our iStore here at Telstra over the last seven years – trust people to share their knowledge openly and easily, and in the vast majority of cases, your trust will be honoured.  The more you “lock up” your knowledge sharing with controls, the less likely it is that people will share.

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