Archive for the 'Communication' Category

Developing an Organisational KM Strategy

Keith February 17th, 2009

 After a long break (due to appearing to be very busy for some time), back to the blog.  Just a brief note to advise that I will be speaking in Wellington, New Zealand at BrightStar’s 7th Annual Information Management Summit on Tuesday 3 and Wednesday 4 March. The title of my presentation is: Developing Organisation-Wide Knowledge Management Strategy and Incorporating Social Media in the Process.  A brief precis follows: 

This international case study presents the Knowledge Management and Transfer toolkit developed by the Telstra Corporation (Australia) Enterprise & Government KM team.
 
This toolkit was used to capture the product and service knowledge developed by the Product Management teams, and make it available to the business sales force, using an integrated program of content, communications and training initiatives.  This included developing a standard taxonomy, governance processes and templates, with all developed content made available via a single portal.
 
This presentation will focus on the processes used to maintain the currency of content, the use of an open policy and rewards and recognition to promote knowledge sharing, and the use of multiple media to ensure that the needs of the total audience were adequately catered for.

The lessons learned from this development are broadly applicable to knowledge capture and sharing in project teams, organisational changes, enterprise-wide knowledge programs and many other similar situations.

I will also be chairing day two of the conference. 

In other news, my son Scott is in the final stages of planning for a two-month trek on the National Bicentennial Trail with three friends (and six horses). We have set up a new blog for loading stories and photos once the trip commences.  They will be starting at Providence (near Canberra), and the plan is to finish at Knockwood, Victoria.  We will be travelling to meet them at least once during the trip.

So that’s two trips I’ll be doing in March, not counting a few days in Darwin for my mother’s 95th Birthday.  And then there’s the CPA Congress in Newcastle, as well…

Mr. Conroy, you are Talking Cock!

Keith November 13th, 2008

Talking Cock (v.): A Singaporean term meaning either to talk nonsense or engage in idle banter.
 
- The Coxford Singlish Dictionary

Over the last few years, I have had the privilege of traveling to Singapore on a number of occasions to speak at conferences.  I have greatly enjoyed the experience - both the conferences, and wandering around Singapore as a tourist.  I have met some fantastic people there, and have greatly enjoyed the culture – and the food!

Singapore is a land of contrasts.  It is richly multicultural, with all public signage in four languages.  The population is predominantly Chinese, yet most of the public institutions are as British as they were before independence.  It has earned a reputation as a non-democratic nation, yet the country is alive with art and innovation, and not in the least like a totalitarian state.  I feel safer walking around the streets anywhere in Singapore than I do in some parts of Melbourne.

Some would like to portray Singapore as a place where freedom of speech is suppressed by the government, yet Singapore is now becoming increasingly open. One friend I have made in Singapore is Enrico Varella.  Enrico introduced me to a fantastic local web site – Talking Cock.

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We are the champions

Keith November 6th, 2008

I am apparently now a “Digital Ministry Champion“. I have just posted my first article: To tweet or not to tweet.

This article is a summary of several previous posts on this site:

You’ve read about Social Media. You may have dipped a toe in the water here or there – or you may be up to your armpits. But have you tweeted yet? What’s all the buzz (or should that be “chorus”) about Twitter? Scared about making the commitment? I was not long ago, too… View full article

Also new to this article:

I have also found [Twitter] to be an amazing way to engage in “open note taking”.  I like to record notes when I attend seminars.  For some time, I have been taking notes on a PDA rather than on paper, as the notes are then synchronised with my PC, and available for blogging or other reuse.  This is great for me.

But with Twitter, I can take notes in just the same way, and everyone “following” me on Twitter can choose to tune in if the topic is of interest.  The notes are necessarily brief, which helps to keep them focused.  Some of the feedback I have received from this has been overwhelmingly positive, with some stating that it is just like being there themselves.  (This is something I will blog about later in more detail.)

… watch this space!

Effective organisational comms

Keith October 31st, 2008

I delivered a half-day workshop at the 2008 CPA Congress on Friday last week on Effective organisational comms – Blending traditional and Web 2.0 techniques.  The slide pack is now available on SlideShare.

This workshop was all about developing a toolkit approach to organisational comms, with an emphasis on social media. Includes engaging and collaborating, segmenting the audience and putting it all together.

You can also see other slide packs on my SlideShare, and a full list of published documents on the Docs page on this site. 

If you would like a presentation or workshop on any of these topics delivered to your organisation, please contact me to arrange.

The Twitter Agency

Keith October 2nd, 2008

@SilkCharm (aka Laurel Papworth) has picked up on a certain organisation that is about to spend a large amount of money on marketing.  This led her to the idea of establishing The Twitter Agency.

SilkCharm has 1,670 followers.  That makes a pretty powerful, well connected agency!  (Hey – I have 59 followers myself!) :-)

So there are now at least thirty of us contributing to the joint effort.  I have absolutely no idea where this is going, but it looks like fun!

Breaking News: Read the full story here.

How not to apply for a job

Keith September 20th, 2008

I was reading somewhere online the other day about mistakes people make when applying for jobs. It reminded me of one episode some years ago – back when I was working in IT, and leading a small team.

Most times when we recruited new staff the process was fairly uneventful. Where it got interesting was the time that we advertised a new vacancy only about six months after a previous one.

The job descriptions for the advertised roles were pretty much the same each time. I noted that one of the applicants for the second vacancy was a guy that we didn’t even short-list for the first one. Let’s call him Mike.

Mike just didn’t seem to have what we were looking for the first time. When he applied the second time, he called me and said that he wouldn’t send me a copy of his CV, because he had: “already sent me one six months ago”.

I’m not sure that I was able to say much for the rest of the phone call. I also never found out if Mike was surprised when he again failed to make the short list…

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Meta-surveys

Keith September 19th, 2008

A bit of breathing space on my current project…

Just reading about yet another organisational survey-like tool – you know, “rate your organisation’s ability at (xyz) on a scale of 1 to 10″.  It reminded me of one I was asked to respond to some time ago.  Working for a multi-siloed behemoth of an organisation, my response to each question was “it depends”.  There was no way to answer this sort of thing on an organisation-wide basis, because the answer would be different in different silos – or even different areas within each silo.

… which in turn made me think about other surveys that never seem to offer choices that make sense, and the general low opinion of surveys that many people have (particularly the odd one or two on actKM). :-)

So, I thought, why not make a survey a two-part approach. 

First, you send out an outline of the information you wish to collect and the set of questions that you think will be useful to collect the information (maybe to a sub-group of the full survey population).  Ask your correspondents to fill in the sort of answers that they would like to choose from, and to also suggest better questions to collect the information.

Then, use what you have collected to construct the actual survey.

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Yammer

Keith September 10th, 2008

Several things to say, and not enough time right now to say them all.  In brief:

  1. Check out Yammer, a “micro-blogging tool for the Enterprise founded by David Sacks, former COO of PayPal and current CEO of Geni” (from the press release).  “Yammer is a tool for making companies and organizations more productive through the exchange of short frequent answers to one simple question: ‘What are you working on?’” Yes, basically Twitter for the enterprise.
  2. There may be some teething issues, but how impressive is it when a web company contacts you when you have a question!? All via the magic of Twitter.  See it here.
  3. Where did they get the name?  “Yammer” in English means to whine or complain, make an outcry or clamour, or talk loudly and persistently.  But this word is very similar to the German “Jammer”, meaning (among other things) a wailing noise.  More particularly, the word “Katzenjammer” literally means “wailing cat”. (And by extension colloquially, a loud, discordant noise, a state of depression or bewilderment, or a hangover, but hopefully those definitions aren’t relevant here.)  How do I know this? I can remember seeing some old, handed-down Katzenjammer Kids comics years ago, although it is apparently still being published.

    So? A cat’s wail is louder than a tweet:-)

Now I really must get back to some paying work.

A Blog Observed

Keith August 28th, 2008

I know that there was a bit of a hiatus here after my exit from Telstra (two posts in April and only one in May), but I have just done a quick check of my Archive list, and it appears that I am currently averaging around 7 posts per month – which is around one post every four days.

It is very tempting to put off posting – particularly when you are incredibly busy – but for all aspiring bloggers out there, the secret is to post when something is on your mind, even just a few words.  A blog post doesn’t have to be a magnum opus, although when you have the time and inspiration that can be good, too. 

The most important thing is to keep up with a fairly steady stream, and keep your network engaged and building as much as possible!

One thing that I now find invaluable is Google Toolbar, which includes a spell checker – this is a lot easier that copying and pasting between Word and WordPress.  Of course, when I do finally get around to upgrading to the latest version of WordPress, it’s all built in!

So, any other bloggers out there, what is your posting average?

Chicken chicken

Keith July 23rd, 2008

This is not one of the presentations from KM Australia…

(Thanks, Nerida!)

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